How to communicate with Russian people?
Russians are pure coconuts, aren't they?
July 4, 2021
Russians are coconuts! And I don't mean to offend anyone! It's just a matter of culture.

All the countries can be metaphorically divided into peaches and coconuts.

People who belong to peach cultures are soft "outside", they're smiling and friendly, it's easy to have a small talk with peaches but when it comes to the "seed", you would hardly crack it and get to know a real person inside.

Coconuts are hard "outside", they might seem unfriendly and barely give you a smile, it's difficult to engage a representative of this culture into a casual talk with a stranger. However, if you manage to get through this hard shell, you have all the chances to be treated almost as a family member (and even get regular smiles from a Russian!)
Here are some tips if you come across with a coconut – Russian edition:

● At your first meet-up don't ask them about their salary, partners or home address. It would be rude and impolite. Instead, talk about hobbies and interests, discuss recent culture news or social events

● Don't get too close to your new Russian mate, respect his/her personal space and refrain from unnecessary touches

● You should shake hands with a male when you greet them or say bye, it would be polite and respectful. And don't forget to take off your gloves (even if it's minus 30C)

● It would be much appreciated if you open a door for a woman if you enter/exit a building together, help her to carry big or heave stuff, but don't cross the line — don't be too curious about her personal belongings

● You can exchange your social media profiles with your Russian acquaintance, but don't scroll the entire feed and discuss it with your "coconut". They would hardly like such an attention. But without a doubt you can say some compliments about their profile picture or top shots

● DO smile! Russians are not used to smile without a reason, but a nice talk is definitely a solid reason to do so

● Don't talk about politics if you're not very familiar with a Russian person. Even if you praise Russian politics and confess your love to Putin, not everyone will like it. There might be millions of opinions on this topic and it's not the best one to get through the shell of your coconut.


Well, if you become a friend – true friend – with a Russian, be ready to feel really cared and welcomed

That's how Russians behave with really close people:

● We like to hug when we meet or greet each other with a slight kiss on a cheek

● Russians are really emotional without hiding any good or bad feelings. We won't answer "I'm good, thanks" being asked "How are you?" if we're not really good. We'll say all the truth, let it be "terrible", "exhausted", or simply "not good"

● Meanwhile, Russians smile a lot too if everything's really fine. We laugh when we're supposed to laugh and cry when we're supposed to cry

● We don't hide the truth from our close people. Russians like deep and sincere talks. There's a saying that the best psychologist is your friend, so why should you spend money, if you have so many people who can listen to you

● Most Russians like to invite their friend to visit them and home, have home parties or just a casual talk in a kitchen with a cup of tea. And don't forget to buy some snacks or other small stuff, it's a must if you visit anyone!


Do you have any similarities with Russians? Are you a coconut or a peach? Would it be easy or difficult for you to make a contact with a Russian?




Here are some tips for you to communicate with Russians ;)
Why do Russians use parentheses in messaging? Why do they eat chocolate with blood? Why are they afraid of the triangle of columns? And how to address Russians in formal situations? Let's figure it out! ;)
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